Frequently Asked Questions

Outpatient FAQs

1) Does COC have a sliding scale program or a payment plan?

We have a sliding scale for inpatient services and adult medication services although this is prioritized for current patients and those ​

discharged from our hospital.

2) Will you fill out paperwork for SSI or disability?

We are unable to provide paperwork solely for SSI or disability. We can provide documents to assist.

3) Do you do court-ordered appointments or fill out paperwork for the probation officer?

We provide treatment and you can request that your record be sent to anyone; however, we do not provide any court ordered services.

4) Will you evaluate my child for a custody hearing?

We cannot provide court documentation; we can evaluate your child or provide therapy for children dealing with separation or divorce.

5) Do you have a Spanish speaking doctor /therapist?

We do have Spanish speaking therapists and psychiatrists.

6) What kind of insurance do you take?

We take all Medicaid plans, Health First, Tricare, most Medicare plans and many private insurance.

7) Do you provide transportation to your offices?

At this time we do not provide transportation, but Medicaid does have transportation through TMS.

8) What are your doctors/therapists qualifications?

All are licensed and given privileges to practice based on their training and experience.

9) Can I have a list of your doctors and therapists?

We do not provide a list, but we will match you with a psychiatrist/therapist based on your needs.

10) Do you have anger management classes?

We do not have anger management classes, but we do have therapists that can provide individual counseling to address anger issues.

Inpatient FAQ's

1) What is a Baker Act?

A Baker Act allows for involuntary examination (what some call emergency or involuntary commitment.) It can be initiated by judges, law enforcement officers, physicians or mental health professionals. There must be evidence that the person: has a mental illness (as defined in the Baker Act) ​is a harm to self, harm to others, or is self neglectful (as defined in the Baker Act.)


2) How long can someone be held on a Baker Act?

A person can be held for involuntary examination for up to 72 hours. If there is no evidence that the patient is a danger to himself or others the psychiatrist can discharge him at any time during those 72 hours.

3) What happens after the patient sees the doctor?

There are many possible outcomes following examination of the patient. This includes the release of the individual to the community, a petition for involuntary inpatient placement (what some call civil commitment), or voluntary treatment (if the person is competent to consent to voluntary treatment and consents to voluntary treatment).

4) If I signed a voluntary why can't I leave whenever I want?

Once you are admitted on a voluntary basis, the facility is authorized by law to detain you without your consent for up to 24 hours after you make

a request to be discharged to determine if you meet the criteria for involuntary examination and treatment; if you do meet the criteria for involuntary placement, a petition is filed with the court within two working days.

5) What happens when the Baker Act expires? Can the patient stay longer?

If you continue to meet criteria for inpatient treatment you will be given the opportunity to sign yourself in voluntarily. If you decline to do so, the psychiatrist may initiate court proceedings for involuntary placement.

6) What happens after discharge, that is, follow up appointments and/or medication.

While a patient, you will be assigned a social worker that will work with you on discharge planning. This could include providing you with a follow up appointment for medication management, therapy, and providing you with a list of community resources.

7) Do you provide housing/placement after discharge?

We do not provide housing or placement unless there are co-morbid medical issues requiring further treatment. In that case we will work with patient and family members to aid in finding placement.

8) What can family bring the patient while he/she is on the unit (e.g., clothes, shoes, food, etc.)?

Patients are allowed to have 2 changes of clothes. We do provide laundry service. Belts, strings, and under-wire bras are not allowed. Food is not allowed. Hygiene products are provided and are not allowed with the exception of the Sheridan Oaks unit. Staff will examine all items brought in.

9) When are visiting hours?​

Visiting hours are Wednesday evenings from 7-8 p.m. and on Saturdays and Sundays from 2-3 p.m. 

Visiting hours are also offered on holidays from 2-3 p.m. Each patient is allowed to have up to 2 visitors at a time. ​

On the Children's Crisis Unit only guardians are permitted to visit. Siblings are not allowed in the Adult units no children under the age of 14 are permitted without permission from the patient's psychiatrist.

​On Harbor Pines visitors are not permitted until the patient has been on the unit for 72 hours.

Pastors and other clergy may visit at any time if requested by the patient.

There are no visiting hours on the Twin Rivers Detox Unit.

Cell phones and purses are not allowed on the units.


10) Why aren't visiting hours offered daily?

During the first few days of hospitalization we are offering crisis stabilization and concentrating on the individual's problems while creating a treatment plan.